Lesson 2 Offering Remote Assistance

Were sorry. The content you requested has been removed. Youll be auto redirected in 1 second. This documentation is archived and is not being maintained. This documentation is archived and is not being maintained. Lesson 2: Offering Remote Assistance Windows Remote Assistance is a Windows Vista feature that allows one user, called a helper, to … Continue reading “Lesson 2 Offering Remote Assistance”

Were sorry. The content you requested has been removed. Youll be auto redirected in 1 second.

This documentation is archived and is not being maintained.

This documentation is archived and is not being maintained.

Lesson 2: Offering Remote Assistance

Windows Remote Assistance is a Windows Vista feature that allows one user, called a helper, to connect to another users desktop session on a remote computer. Once connected, the helper can view and optionally interact with the assisted persons desktop. This lesson describes step by step how to offer technical assistance to another user through this tool.

After this lesson, you will be able to:

Request Remote Assistance from another user.

Answer a Remote Assistance request.

Offer unsolicited Remote Assistance to another user.

To allow a helper to connect to a computer by using Remote Assistance, you first need to enable Remote Assistance on that computer. To do so, select the Allow Remote Assistance Connections To This Computer check box in the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure 12-8.

Figure 12-8Enabling Remote Assistance

As mentioned in the previous lesson, to locate the Remote tab, first open the System window, and then click Remote Settings on the Tasks menu, as shown in Figure 12-9.

Figure 12-9Accessing the Remote tab of System Properties

After Remote Assistance is enabled on a computer, a Remote Assistance connection to that computer can be initiated in one of two ways: by the users requesting assistance from the helper or by the helpers offering unsolicited assistance to the user. Of these two methods, the first is simpler to implement.

NOTE Remote Assistance firewall exception

When you enable Remote Assistance, Windows Vista automatically adds a local firewall exception for Remote Assistance.

A user can request remote assistance from a helper by creating a Remote Assistance invitation. To create a Remote Assistance invitation, first open the Windows Remote Assistance wizard by clicking Start, pointing to All Programs, clicking Maintenance, and then clicking Windows Remote Assistance.

The first page of the Windows Remote Assistance wizard is shown in Figure 12-10.

Figure 12-10The Windows Remote Assistance wizard

To request remote assistance, on the first page of the wizard, click the option to invite someone you trust to help you. This step opens the page shown in Figure 12-11.

Figure 12-11Choosing a Remote Assistance invitation method

On this page you can choose whether to send the invitation file to the helper through e-mail or simply to save the invitation in the file system so that the helper can later access it through a network share or another means. In either case, the invitation file must be password protected.

After you choose the password and complete the wizard, the Remote Assistance toolbar, shown in Figure 12-12, appears on the users desktop. Note the toolbars status message of Waiting for incoming connection.

Figure 12-12The Remote Assistance toolbar

At this point the helper must use the Remote Assistance wizard to open the invitation he or she has received. To do so, the helper first chooses the Offer To Help Someone option on the first page of the wizard. This step opens the page shown in Figure 12-13. To open the invitation file, the helper uses the Browse button or enters the path to the file in the appropriate text box and then clicks Finish.

Figure 12-13Opening a Remote Assistance invitation

The helper is then prompted for the password of the file. If the helper can successfully enter the password, the assisted party receives a Windows Remote Assistance offer message, such as the one shown in Figure 12-14.

Figure 12-14Accepting a Remote Assistance connection

Before you can successfully offer unsolicited Remote Assistance to a user running Windows Vista, you need to perform a number of preparatory steps:

a.Msra.exe (program). When Remote Assistance is enabled on the users computer, this exception is created automatically.

b.Raserver.exe (program). You must add this firewall exception manually.

c.TCP 135 (port). You must add this firewall exception manually.

In Local Computer Policy or Group Policy, enable the Offer Remote Assistance policy setting for the assisted partys computer. You can find this policy setting in a Group Policy object (GPO) by navigating to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/System/Remote Assistance.

a.To enable this setting, you must add at least one user account to the Helpers list in the policy setting. Once added in the policy setting, these user accounts also appear in the Offer Remote Assistance Helpers security group on the local machine.

b.By default, when you enable this policy setting, the designated helpers are allowed to view and control other users computers. However, in this policy setting you can also choose the option to allow helpers only to view remote computers.

The Offer Remote Assistance policy setting is shown in Figure 12-15.

Figure 12-15The Offer Remote Assistance policy setting

IMPORTANT Remote Assistance helpers list

Only users added to the helpers list can offer unsolicited Remote Assistance.

After you have performed these preparatory steps, you can easily offer Remote Assistance to another user by using the Remote Assistance wizard. On the first page of the wizard, select the Offer To Help Someone option. Then, after you provide the name or address of a computer to help, the wizard immediately initiates a Remote Assistance connection to that computer. At this point the assisted party receives a Remote Assistance offer message identical to the one shown in Figure 12-14.

When the assisted party approves the Remote Assistance offer, the status message of the Remote Assistance toolbar on his or her local machine changes to Connected to your helper. Your helper can now see your desktop. At the same time, the assisted partys desktop appears within a Windows Remote Assistance window on the helpers desktop, as shown in Figure 12-16.

Figure 12-16The helpers Remote Assistance window

At first, the helper can only view and not interact with the assisted users desktop. If the helper wants to interact with the remote users desktop, the helper must click the Request Control button on the Windows Remote Assistance window menu bar. This step opens the message, shown in Figure 12-17, on the remote users desktop.

Figure 12-17In Remote Assistance, the assisted user always voluntarily grants control to the remote helper

Of particular importance in this message prompt is the option to allow the helper to respond to User Account Control (UAC) prompts. If this option isnotselected, the helpers Windows Remote Assistance window will go blank whenever a step requiring elevation is performed on the assisted users computer. The helper will be able to regain control of the remote desktop only when the assisted user handles the UAC prompt by providing administrator credentials or clicking Continue, as appropriate. If, on the other hand, this option is selected, UAC prompts will be passed to the helper during the Remote Assistance session. Note also that selecting this option itself requires elevation.

After control is granted to the helper, the helper can interact with the assisted users desktop. The assisted user can pause the session at any point by clicking the Pause button and resume the session by clicking Continue. To end the session, either party can click the Disconnect button on the toolbar.

NOTE Remote Assistance through Windows Live Messenger

In addition to requesting and offering Remote Assistance through methods built into Windows Vista, you can also request and offer Remote Assistance through Windows Live Messenger. This functionality, though interesting, is not covered on the 70-622 exam and is therefore beyond the scope of this training kit.

Windows Remote Assistance Compatib
ility Issues

Windows Remote Assistance is not new to Windows Vista, but there are enough feature differences with earlier versions to create certain limited compatibility problems.

You cannot offer unsolicited Windows Remote Assistance from Windows Vista to either Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, Remote Assistance supported voice capability. Voice capability is no longer supported in Windows Vista.

In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, you cant pause a Windows Remote Assistance session. If the assisted party is running Windows Vista and pauses a session while connected to a helper running Windows XP, the helper will not be notified that the session is paused.

A remote user agrees to let you share control of her desktop. After you attempt to open Computer Management on her computer, your Windows Remote Assistance window goes blank. What is the likeliest cause?

Can you offer unsolicited Remote Assistance from a Windows Vista computer to a Windows XP computer?

When agreeing to let you share control of her desktop, the remote user did not select the option to allow you to respond to UAC prompts. No.

Practice: Offering Remote Assistance

In this practice, you will create a Remote Assistance invitation and allow a remote helper to take control of your computer.

In this practice, you will create a network share in which to place Remote Assistance invitations.

Log on to Dcsrv1 as an administrator.

Create a new folder in the root of the C drive. Name the folder Remote Assistance Invitations.

Open the properties of the Remote Assistance Invitations folder.

In the Sharing tab, click Share This Folder, and then click the Permissions button.

In the Permissions for Remote Assistance Invitations dialog box, assign Everyone the Allow Full Control permission, and then click OK.

In the Remote Assistance Invitations dialog box, click the Security tab.

In the Security tab, assign the Users group the Allow-Modify permission.

Click OK to close the Remote Assistance Properties dialog box.

Practice 2: Creating a Remote Assistance Invitation

In this practice, you will create a Remote Assistance invitation on Vista2 and save the invitation to the network share you created in Practice 1.

Log on to Nwtraders from Vista2 as a standard user (not an administrator).

Open the System Control Panel by right-clicking Computer from the Start menu and then selecting Properties.

Beneath Tasks, click Remote Settings.

In the UAC credential prompt, enter the credentials of an administrator.

In the Remote tab of the System Properties dialog box, select the Allow Remote Assistance Connections To This Computer check box, and then click OK.

Open Windows Remote Assistance by clicking Start, pointing to All Programs, clicking Maintenance, and then clicking Windows Remote Assistance.

The Windows Remote Assistance wizard opens.

On the Do You Want To Ask For Or Offer Help page, click Invite Someone You Trust To Help You.

On the How Do You Want To Invite Someone To Help You page, click Save This Invitation As A File.

On the Save The Invitation As A File page, type

\\dcsrv1\Remote Assistance Invitations\RAinvite1

in the Enter A Path And File Name text box.

Enter a password in the Password and Confirm The Password text boxes, and then click Finish.

The Windows Remote Assistance toolbar appears with the status message Waiting for incoming connection

Practice 3: Answering a Remote Assistance Invitation

In this practice, you will use the Remote Assistance invitation created in Practice 2 to provide Remote Assistance to Vista2 from Vista1.

Log on to Nwtraders from Vista1 as an administrator.

In the Windows Remote Assistance wizard, on the Do You Want To Ask For Or Offer Help page, click Offer To Help Someone.

On the Choose A Way To Connect To The Other Persons Computer page, type

\\dcsrv1\Remote Assistance Invitations\RAinvite1

in the Enter An Invitation File Location text box, and then click Finish.

In the Windows Remote Assistance dialog box, enter the password you assigned to the invitation in the Enter Password text box, and then click OK.

The Windows Remote Assistance window opens with the status message Waiting For Acceptance.

On the Vista2 desktop, a Windows Remote Assistance dialog box has appeared and asks you whether you would like to allow the remote helper to connect to your computer.

On the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar, the status message has changed to Connected to your helper Your helper can now see your desktop.

On Vista1, the Windows Remote Assistance window has changed to Viewing the screen. Within the window, you can see the Vista2 desktop.

Who currently has control of the session, the user on Vista1, the user on Vista2, or both?

On Vista2, a new Windows Remote Assistance dialog box has appeared on the desktop and asks you whether you would like to allow the remote helper to share control of your desktop.

On Vista2, in the Windows Remote Assistance dialog box, click Yes.

On Vista2, the status message in the Windows Remote Assistance toolbar has changed to Connected to your helper Your helper is sharing control of your computer.

Switch to Vista1. Spend a few minutes experimenting with the control of the Vista2 desktop and exploring the various options on the Windows Remote Assistance toolbars.

On Vista1, click Disconnect, and then click Yes to confirm.

Close all open windows on both computers.

Windows Remote Assistance allows one user, called a helper, to connect to the live session of another user on a remote computer. Once connected, the helper can see the remote users desktop and (if allowed) interact with it.

For a computer to receive Remote Assistance, the feature must be enabled in the Remote tab in the System Properties dialog box.

Remote Assistance can be solicited or unsolicited. When Remote Assistance is solicited, a user creates a Remote Assistance request and sends it to the helper. With unsolicited Remote Assistance, the helper does not need a request, but this method requires significant preparation.

There are a few compatibility issues between Remote Assistance in Windows Vista and earlier versions of Remote Assistance. Most important, a helper in Windows Vista cannot provide unsolicited assistance to a user running Windows XP.

The following questions are intended to reinforce key information presented in this lesson. The questions are also available on the companion CD if you prefer to review them in electronic form.

Answers to these questions and explanations of why each answer choice is right or wrong are located in the Answers section at the end of the book.

You work as a desktop support technician in a large company whose network consists of a single Active Directory directory service domain. All client computers are running Windows Vista Business.

While working at the help desk, you receive a call from an employee in another building who is receiving an unexpected error whenever he performs an elaborate procedure within an application. He is having difficulty describing the procedure and would prefer to show it to you on the computer.

Which of the following is the best way to watch the user perform the procedure that generates the error?

Use Remote Desktop to connect to the users computer.

Ask the user to connect to your computer through Remote Desktop.

Ask the user to create and send you a Windows Remote Assistance invitation file through e-mail.

Create and send the user a Windows Remote Assistance invitation file through e-mail.

You work as a desktop support technician in a company whose network consists of a single Active Directory domain. You want to be able to offer unsolicited Remote Assistance to a user by specifying her computer name in the Windows Remote Assistance wizard. If both of your computers are run
ning Windows Vista Business, which of the following is NOT a requirement to achieve this?

Your user account must be added to the Offer Remote Assistance Helpers group on the remote computer.

In Group Policy, enable the Offer Remote Assistance policy option. C. Add firewall exceptions for msra.exe, raserver.exe, and port 135.

Your user account must be a member of the Administrators group on the remote computer.

Use Windows 7 Remote Assistance Easy Connect to

Once a business-oriented feature, the release of Windows XP introduced two new technologies to the public Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance.

Remote Desktopkept its focus on business use, providing users with access to their home computers while you are on the go. You can run your computer as if you were there, but through a mobile machine (i.e laptop, smartphone, tablet, etc.).

On the other hand,Remote Assistancestrives to serve the home users out there. Remote Assistance had the ability toshare your Windows desktopwith any other Windows user. You can share control of both your mouse and keyboard with said user over either a LAN (Local Area Network) or over the Internet (WAN).

Naturally, the future brings innovative software solution andWindows 7brought on a new feature calledEasy Connect. This recent addition to Remote Assistance simplifies the entire process by requiring only a password, andnot evena file exchange. Even the password can be done away with if contact files are exchanged and a trusting relationship is established.

Lets say you are having a problem with your Windows 7 machine and you require the assistance of someone with a little more expertise. This step-by-step guide will take you through the steps of requesting help using Remote Assistance Easy Connect.

Step 1:Type assistance into the search bar of your start menu, then click on theWindows Remote Assistanceprogram link to launch Remote Assistance.

Step 2:You will be asked whether you would like to ask for or offer help. To ask for help, selectInvite someone you trust to help you.

Step 3:Now you will be offered the option tosave this invitation as a fileand attach it to an email (if the other user does not have access to Easy Connect, such as using an older version of Windows),use e-mail to send an invitation(provided you have a compatible email program), oruse easy connect. Select Use Easy Connect as shown below.

Step 4:The new window shown below will pop up. This is your unique password that your helper will need to access your computer. Keep track of it so that you can provide it when your helper needs to input it in his or her own PC.

Now lets say you are on the other side of this scenario and taking time out of your busy day to help out a friend in need. Here is whatyoushould do!

Step 1:Type assistance into the search bar of your start menu,  then click on theWindows Remote Assistanceprogram link to launch Remote Assistance.

Step 2:This time you would select theHelp someone who has invited youoption.

Step 3:Once again, you would choose toUse Easy Connect. Alternately, if you were sent a file as an invitation, you would select the other option.

Step 4:You are then asked to enter the password that was provided to the receiving participant. Once you enter the password you will be granted access to their desktop.

Some neat features include the ability to have a chat session in order to clarify andexplain the troubleshooting stepsthat you are taking, as well as the ability to stopsharing your desktopat anytime by simply pressing the button at the top of the window that reads Stop sharing.

The best thing is how easy it is to help out a friend or family member, say goodbye to frustrating phone calls and email exchanges. Now those of us that are technically inclined can skip the chit-chat and just fix the problem!

Its a great but little known feature. If your friends and relatives knew about it they would never leave you alone!!!!!

provided you have a compatible email program.

WTF is compatible email program ? Are there any compatible email programs in this world ? And if there are, how could I find out these wonderful things? Googling did not help. I want to connect my win 8 tablet with my pc probably almost every day. Currently I have to save the file, open it in mailer as attachmet, send it etc. Every saved mouseclick would be just amazing.

have you heard of Microsoft Outlook Professional? that amazing thing sends as attachment straightaway 😉

Excellent article. Remote support allows multiple computer users located at any place in the world to directly connect and communicate with one another. Vendors such as RHUB offer on premise Collaborative Remote Support Appliance with in-built conferencing facilities. It is very useful for businesses wanting to reduce incident handling time and increase call capacity without increasing the budget.

Why wont we opt for Teamviewer or such that utilities which gives the same result?

Because this is free and built into windows?

LinkedIn vs LinkedIn Lite: Is There a Major Difference?

3 Cool Apps to Track Now Playing Music History on Your Google Pixel 2

How to Use Your Android as a Wi-Fi Repeater

10 Reasons You Shouldnt Be in a Hurry to Buy an iPhone X

Heres How Apple Has Been Pricing iPhones Over Past 10 Years

How to Add Extensions to VLC Player

How to Use Your Android as a Wi-Fi Repeater

Convert DVD to Digital? 10 Reasons Why You Should Try WinX DVD Ripper

Convert DVD to Digital? 10 Reasons Why You Should Try WinX DVD Ripper

Facebook has Quietly Launched their Desktop Chat App for Workplace Along with Screen-sharing

DRmare M4V Converter: iTunes DRM Removal Made Easy

7 Cool Vivo V7/V7 Plus Camera Tips and Tricks for Great Selfies

Telephoto Lens Explained: Whats Its Use in a Mobile Camera

6 Uber Cool Apple iPhone 8 Accessories That You Shouldnt Miss

4 Smart Ways to Send Large Files Over Email

9 Awesome HD Wallpapers from Avengers Infinity War

10 Best Live YouTube Channels from around the World

Free Xbox Games with Gold for December

7 Awesome Free Word Games for Android

5 Simple Yet Challenging Free Android Games to Sharpen Your Brain

When is 5G Coming to India? Not Anytime Soon, Industry Experts Suggest

Snapchat Now Allows School Newspapers to Contribute to Publisher Stories

How Much Is Your Data Worth? This Kaspersky Experiment Will Tell You

Unable to find Microsoft Remote Desktop

When I try to open a new RDP session, I get the message:&quotUnable to find Microsoft Remote Desktop. Get it from the App&quot (see attached screenshot)

Ive got the Mac version of Microsoft Remote Desktop installed, but I still get this message.Researching this forum, it sounds like it should use the &quotembedded version&quot.

Please check the information in this thread:

And let me know if that answers your question!

I tried clicking on &quotembedded&quot in preferences, but it still didnt work.

However, once I downloaded the latest version of the Microsoft Remote Desktop (the one from the App Store), it worked.

The option in preferences just controls the default for new connections.

For existing connections, check the Display property. External means use the external client (MS RDP), Embedded and Undocked use the internal FreeRDP client (either in an embedded tab or an undocked window, respectively)

I downloaded the latest 1.0.4.0 and now cannot launch any of my RDP sessions. It started off by saying unable to find MS Remote Desktop, but following installing that, now every connection was to use MS RD! How do I revert to using the built in client?

fixed by changing session type! Would be good to know this before installing upgraded version!!

We had a configuration issue with a new setting introduce in version 1.0.3.0.Go to the menu Remote Desktop Manager – Preferences…Select the session type and set the Display to the correct value.You can now choose to force all of your session to open in external, embedded or undocked mode.Choose default to use the Display configured in your session.

Is this what you meant by saying &quotfixed by changing the session type&quot ?

Many thanks for the prompt reply, that is exactly what I meant!