Apple publicly accuses Australia of anti-encryption legislation

Apple publicly accuses Australia of anti-encryption legislation The Australian government is considering a bill that will require technology companies like Apple to provide “key assistance” to government agencies that are investigating crime cases. According to the Australian government, encryption is problematic because encrypted communications are being used by more and more terrorist organizations and organized … Continue reading “Apple publicly accuses Australia of anti-encryption legislation”

Apple publicly accuses Australia of anti-encryption legislation
The Australian government is considering a bill that will require technology companies like Apple to provide “key assistance” to government agencies that are investigating crime cases. According to the Australian government, encryption is problematic because encrypted communications are being used by more and more terrorist organizations and organized criminals.

In response, Apple today wrote a seven-page open letter to the Australian Parliament, in which it accused the proposal of this legislative proposal.

Apple said the provisions of the bill are too vague, with unclear restrictions. In addition, it specifically explains the importance of encryption in protecting national security and citizen life.

“In the face of these threats, it is not the time to weaken encryption. This will make crimes easier and harder, which is taking a huge risk. It is getting stronger rather than weaker. Encryption is the best way to protect against these threats.”

Apple’s view of weaker encryption technology is necessary to assist law enforcement investigations. In the past five years, the company has processed more than 26,000 data requests in Australia to assist in the investigation of criminal cases.

The company said that the Australian government still has a lot of work to do with the bill, including a clear mandate to ban encryption or security protection, a series of issues Apple wants the Australian Parliament to resolve, and so on.related articles http://idodrugs.net/103652.html